Special Guests

2018 Special Guests

Quechua Alliance Annual Meeting, November 17th, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

mirian_masaquiza

Mirian Masaquiza 

UN Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

A Kichwa-Salasaka from Ecuador, she is currently the Social Affairs Officer of the UN Indigenous Peoples and Development Branch. Throughout her career, Mirian has had the opportunity to work in three fronts: as an indigenous activist; a staff member of the United Nations; and a diplomat/advisor at the Government of Ecuador.

Most of her work is related to rights of Indigenous Peoples as well as a range of issues such as gender, cultural and educational matters, climate change, inter-agency affairs, outreach, political analysis, non-governmental organizations.


 

liberato_kani

Ricardo Flores “Liberato Kani”

Quechua hip-hop artist and composer

Liberato Kani is one of the key figures of the Quechua Hip Hop movement in Peru. His music challenges the stereotypes on Indigenous Languages, usually seen as outdated. He is an inspiration for many young people who want to reclaim their Indigenous heritage. As Liberato Kani states: “Quechua [now] means resistance”.

Liberato Kani’s work is influenced by Peruvian writer José María Arguedas. In his songs he incorporates Arguedas’ Quechua poetry.

Liberato Kani has offered talks and concerts at different venues, including Peru’s National Theatre, Peru’s Ministry of Culture and in the city of Berlin (Germany). He also has been featured in different TV shows, radio stations and written media, including Spain’s El País, CLAS NYU’s website, Peru’s El Comercio, etc.

Ricardo will discuss and share his experiences on “Quechua & Rap, Urban and Contemporary Indigenous Culture”. This event is possible thanks to Penn’s Latin American and Latino External Speakers (LALSES) Series award and the Quechua Language Program at Penn.

Listen to Liberato Kani’s first album “Rimay Pueblo” here.


elva ambia

Elva Ambía

Founder and director of the Quechua Collective of New York.

A native of Chincheros (Apurímac, Perú) Elva moved to the U.S. as a teenager, but the lack of Quechua-language resources, the demands of school and work, and the absence of a Quechua-speaking community made it incredibly difficult for her to maintain the Quechua language. Now in her seventies, she is determined not only to revive her mother tongue for herself, but to help promote respect for Quechua languages and indigenous cultures throughout New York City. Elva is an inspiration for the new generation of U.S. Quechua learners and speakers. Her life journey was featured in the short documentary ‘Living Quechua‘ (2015).

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Join us for the 4th Quechua Alliance Annual Meeting this November 17th, 2018 in Philadelphia. Fore more information, click here.

 

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